Numbers & Notes – Jamaica’s National Championships 2017


elaine_thompson

8.16m

This clutch personal best leap took Ramone Bailey to a place in the pit he’d never previously been. It also likely booked him a ticket to embark on his maiden senior World Championships voyage.

10.71s

That’s the time Elaine Thompson ran to secure her second consecutive national 100m title. It was just 1/100th of a second off from the scintillating 10.70 second national record clocking she produced to cop the crown last year.

Interestingly, her six career 10.7x efforts have been aided by tailwinds of less than one metre per second. The elusive 10.6x performance, quite literally, appears to be just a breath of wind away.

11.24s

This was sprint starlet Kevona Davis’ winning mark in the Under-18 Girls 100m event. The time comfortably eclipsed the former national youth record (11.36) once shared by Nadine Palmer and Carrie Russell. It also firmly positioned the phenomenal 15 year-old as one of the best bets for gold at the upcoming IAAF World Under-18 Championships in Nairobi, Kenya.

Davis was pulled to the line by the diminutive Briana Williams, whose outstanding 11.30 second performance was truly undeserving of just a second place finish.

12.90s

The super short span of time it took sprint hurdler extraordinaire Omar McLeod to reset the national 110-metre hurdles record. The sterling effort established the ex-Manchester High and Kingston College man as the joint fifth fastest performer of all-time – just 1/10th of a second adrift of Aries Merritt’s world record.

13.32s

17 year-old De’Jour Russell’s time in the senior men’s 110-metre hurdles event was nothing short of mind-boggling. The exploits of 2008 Olympic champion Dayron Robles, who was prolific over the 42-inch hurdles in his late teens, probably offers up the best case for comparison. Robles age-18 world best stands at ‘just’ 13.46 seconds. That’s over a 1/10th slower than Russell ran at well over a year younger. (Of course, the Cuban subsequently went on to crush a 13-flat months before his 20th birthday.)

20.94m

Kevin Nedrick’s mark to win the junior men’s shot put extended the national Under-20 record he’d set at ‘Champs’ back in March. The signs are promising for him to become the first Jamaican in his age group to break the 21-metre barrier. Hopefully, he’ll make this additional bit of history at the upcoming Pan American Junior Championships with budding American shot put stars Jordan Geist and Adrian Piperi for company.

48.83s

The time it took veteran halfmiler-turned-quartermile hurdler Ricardo Cunningham to finally secure a spot on a World Championships team. The 36 year-old closed like a freight train to overhaul the improving Andre Clarke and script one of the most heartwarming stories of the meet.

54.29s

This was Ronda Whyte’s personal best clocking in the women’s 400-metre hurdles final. She literally came out of nowhere to stun a field brimming with much more decorated athletes. And she appeared so full of run at the end that one really wonders what she’s capable of once she gets her pacing right. Based on the evidence, I can see at least a 53-mid performance in her future.

62.73m

Kellion Knibb’s mark to win the women’s discus reset the beseiged national record for the umpteenth time this year. It’s indeed a good time to be alive for Jamaican throws fans.

70.93m

Caniggia Raynor’s big throw tightened his grip on the men’s national hammer record. Admittedly, he’s still a bit short of absolute world class. However, his slow but steady improvement does indicate some pleasing progress in one of the least popular events on the local scene.

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